Tag Archives: trends

Kalahari Melon: the gift for your skin from the deserts of Africa

by Holly Harmon, Executive Director of Training and Aesthetics, Placecol USA  hollyh@placecolusa.com

Oil from the seeds of the Kalahari melon is used to moisturize, regenerate and restructure the skin. Kalahari melon oil is rich in essential fatty acids, especially linoleic, oleic and palmitic fatty acids.  It has high antioxidant activity, which possibly helps the plant to survive in the harsh Kalahari desert environment.  

Our cosmetic scientists in South Africa have long known the restoring properties of Kalahari Melon extract along with the many other elements from nature on the Continent.  Of course, Africa is rich with many indigenous plants and fruits whose extracts are unparalleled for skin restoration and repair.  You will find these “gifts” from Africa used throughout our skin care collections.  Our Renaissance® Restoring Night Cream includes the healing antidote from nature for damaged and aging skin–Kalahari Melon–along with Mongongo Nut Oil and Rhodiola Extract.  

About the Kalahari Melon

The Kalahari melon (citrullus lanatus) is also known as the Tsamma melon or wild watermelon and is the biological ancestor of the common watermelon now found worldwide. It is a creeping annual herb with hairy stems and bright yellow flowers.  Unlike the common watermelon, whose flesh is sweet and red, the Kalahari melon’s juicy flesh is pale yellow or green, and tastes bitter. Kalahari melon fruits are small and round in the wild, but larger and oval when cultivated.  The Kalahari melon is highly adapted to surviving drought and the harsh light of the desert environment. Although found all over Southern Africa, it is most closely associated with the Kalahari sands of Namibia, Botswana, south-western Zambia and western Zimbabwe. 

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Essence Magazine Offers Insight on African-American Women’s Beauty Market

Posted: May 14, 2009

A study by Essence magazine, in conjunction with Vision Critical Group, shows that African-American women spend nearly twice as much on skin care annually than the general market.

Essence magazine shared the results of its proprietary study, Smart Beauty IV (developed in conjunction with New York-based research firm Vision Critical Group) at the fourth installment of the Smart Beauty series. Presented at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel in New York City, the study focuses on African-American women and the prestige beauty category, and a panelist discussion that analyzed the attitudes and purchase behaviors of the modern African-American beauty consumer.

“Essence’s Smart Beauty research confirms that African-American women are confident and aspirational; embracing and celebrating their unique beauty to the fullest,” says Mikki Taylor, beauty and cover director, Essence. “As trendsetters, African-American women enjoy the beauty experience and are loyal consumers, who trust prestige brands to deliver the quality they expect.”

Designed to educate, inform and inspire change in marketing to women of color by identifying their buying power, influence, needs and desires, the research methodology for Smart Beauty IV included online surveys among a national sample of African-American women and general market women, 18–54 years old. The sample of more than 1,500 included a mix of women who used branded beauty products and have shopped at a prestige store for a cosmetic, skin care or hair care beauty product in the past six months.

Highlights of Smart Beauty IV:

  • Regarding spending power: African-American women spend 80% more on cosmetics annually and nearly twice as much on skin care products than general market women do annually.
  • Regarding marketing to African-American women vs. general market women: A brand she aspires to (48%) is a more important attribute than one with an appealing celebrity endorsement (33%) when choosing a beauty product.
  • Regarding the mindset of African-American women: Her self-confidence is evident in describing herself as intelligent, independent, attractive, ambitious, sexy and fabulous more often than general market women.
  • Regarding what informs the purchase decision for African-American women: Reflecting her personal style, being a brand she trusts, offering high-quality ingredients and being suited to her needs all stand out as key attributes to compel purchase across cosmetic, skin and hair categories respectively.